Trophy Mountain Glacier Lillies

Trophy Mountain Glacier Lillies

It’s June and one of the most spectacular sub alpine flower meadows in the world, the Trophy Mountain Glacier Lillies are in full bloom. There is still some snow on the hiking trail (to the knees by latest report, but the view makes it worthwhile. It’s a hike you will remember.

Trophy Mountain Glacier Lillies June 2019 – Photo courtesy of Marco Bokor. Used by permission

The Trophy Mountain meadows are one of the most easily accessible sub-alpine meadows in British Columbia. The meadows bloom twice each year, in early June it is the brilliant yellow of the glacier Lillies. The same meadows are transformed into a rainbow of colour when mountain daisy, Indian paintbrush, arctic lupine and a myriad of other flowers bloom in late July to early August. Both blooms are breathtakingly beautiful.

The Trophy Mountains

“The Trophy Mountains rise 2,575 metres into the sky, with nine peaks towering over the Shuswap Highlands of southern Wells Gray Provincial Park. Their northern slopes are steep and cloaked in glaciers, while their southern slopes are gentle and dotted with alpine lakes and flower meadows.” BC Parks.

Getting There

From the junction at Highway #5 and the Information Centre, drive north along the Clearwater Valley Road (Wells Gray park Road) for 11.8 km and then turn right onto the gravel road. Travel along this road for 1.7 km and then turn left onto Road 10 (Road 80 on the right leads to an alternate route; for experienced persons only). Continue on Road 10 for 3.1 km before turning right onto Road 201. This road soon enters and skirts up and around a large logging clear cut area. Ignore small branch roads as you travel 4.4 km along Road 201 to where it dead-ends in a parking lot. The trail to the meadows begins to the left of the parking area.

Hiking

From the parking lot a gently ascending trail takes you on a relaxed 45 minute, 1 km., hike to the sub-alpine meadows of the Trophy Mountains. The elevation gain is 200 metres.

The trail winds its way through an old-growth forest of fragrant Engelmann spruce and sub-alpine fir. The small size of these 250-year-old trees attests to  the harsh living conditions at this altitude.

The trail passes several small streams before breaking out into the open expanses of the sub-alpine meadow. In July and August the endless waves of vibrant coloured wildflowers make this one of the most popular hikes in the area.

From the meadow, the trail continues a further 1.25 hours across lichen encrusted rocks to Sheila Lake. The trail ends at the lake, however, an additional hour of uphill climbing will get you to the panoramic views of Skyline Ridge (12 km round trip from the parking lot). These ridges are over 2,500 metres and weather can change quickly, therefore, you should be sure to carry a topographic map, compass, warm clothing and extra food. Maps can be purchased at the Wells Gray Visitor Centre.

Above the treeline, weather can change without warning. Sun fog, rain and snow are all possible, even in July or August. So dress accordingly, and watch the weather. (All directions courtesy of BC Parks. More information and maps are available here.)

Where to Stay

When travelling the North Thompson, when visiting Wells Gray Park and area or when going to Vancouver to Edmonton (or vice versa) stay at Valley Hideaway Guest House. We are open year round.

Book your stay with us. We are open year round.

 

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